For minority and women supplier diversity business entrepreneurs

This past February, I was privileged to be part of a small group of thought leaders, strategic partners, and minority businesses which were convened by the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) for its 2015 MBDA Stakeholder Summit in Washington, D.C. The Summit, entitled “Elevating the Narrative and Direction of Minority Businesses as a National Economic Priority,” was designed to raise the level of awareness, foster discussion, and develop a blueprint to help drive growth and global competitiveness for the nation’s minority business community.

While I’m not sure that developing a blueprint to drive growth could have been accomplished in one day, we certainly had spirited discussions that highlighted some of the needs of the minority business community. As a group, we all agreed that access to capital plays a huge role in the ability of minority businesses to scale up. So what to do? External access in most cases depends on the personal credit of the owner(s) but there are opportunities available via Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) and other small independent organizations in pockets around the country. The challenge is to educate these businesses about these access points and how they can prepare themselves to take advantage of opportunities these points represent.

Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker’s remarks to the group at the Summit highlight a stark reality:
“[the MBDA] faces shrinking budgets, growing demands on its resources, the demand for better data and faster technical assistance, and the need to open up more markets domestically and abroad for minority firms.” She emphasized that it is incumbent on all of us who are in the know to “work together to ensure that everyone advocating for [minority business enterprises]—from MBDA to your organizations to your colleagues across the country—is adapting to meet the challenges of the 21st century.”

Interestingly, that same week, I began a 10-week course of study in the 3rd National Cohort of the Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Businesses (10KSB) program at Babson College. I was not quite sure what I had gotten myself into except that I had heard good things about this program and wanted to take advantage of the opportunity it presented to grow our business. Four weeks in and I am feeling the pressure but also learning what I didn’t know and how to put it into action. There are several 10KSB programs in local markets around the country run by community colleges. I encourage you to apply or talk with a CDFI to learn more about what it takes for you to access the capital you need to grow your business to scale.

These pathways to capital are not the only options available to minority and women business enterprises wanting to scale up, so MBE magazine will do our part to educate you about where to find these options. If you know of any who fit this profile, send an email to mbewbe@mbemag.com with their contact information and we will share it via our online Resource Page on www.mbemag.com.

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MBE Resource Center

MBE's Business Opportunities resource covers business-related financing, consulting, and programs available for the Supplier Diversity community and M/WBEs. Updated monthly.

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MBE's M/WBE Resource Directory is a comprehensive list of resource organizations (including links) that support the Supplier Diversity community and M/WBEs.

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Refer to MBE's Acronyms & Terminology list for frequently used acronyms and terminology and an overview of the major organizations supporting the Supplier Diversity community.

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