For minority and women supplier diversity business entrepreneurs

I had the pleasure of speaking with a young woman from one of the Eastern European countries earlier this month. She told me of her start in business. She came to the U.S. as an adult, having no knowledge of English. The only job she could find was at the 7-Eleven. But this was not her American Dream. She worked hard to learn the language but still could not find a job that satisfied that dream.

So, she decided to start her own business. According to her, "Since I was the only one who wanted to hire me, then I decided to hire me."

What does it take to be an entrepreneur-to strike out on your own and hire yourself?

Well, you need courage to face the uncertainty of the future-courage to overcome the internal voice that tells you that failure is likely, courage to step out from under the security umbrella that comes with having a steady job. It takes a person who is brave enough to take the first step toward an endeavor and be the final say-to know that their success (and often the success and security of others) relies on them entirely, to know that the buck stops with you.

That's the kind of courage that Hiten Patel (Going All In) had when he acquired the company that is today known as Collabera. He took the chance, left the corporate world, and braved the unknown. But, courage alone is not enough. It also takes vision-the kind that Hernan Etcheto (An Incredible Edible) had when he looked at an egg and saw more than meets the eye. He saw the potential for improvement. And so he went out on his own to make that improvement. His new product represents a major step forward for the food sciences with benefits for our service men and women and many others living in places where fresh food isn't a luxury that they can afford.

It takes tenacity-the kind Lisa Michelle Chretien (Making Moves) showed when she burst into an industry dominated by men with little experience running a business. Chretien, who today has contracts with some of the most impressive trade show regulars, didn't throw her hands in the air and give up in the face of S-corps and C-corps, neither did she when she looked around the room and saw few female cohorts. She was going to start her own business in the trade show industry, and that was final. If tried and failed-fine. But she was going to try.

Most of all, I believe it takes a strong belief in one's self and the willingness to work hard. That's what these entrepreneurs had and that's what they did. That young lady is very successful now and I hope one day soon to be able to tell her story in our pages. Until then, we will continue to celebrate your successes through courage, vision, and tenacity, by telling your stories. But, remember, we won't know them unless you share them with us. Go ahead and connect with us via social media or just drop us a line when you have something to say. 

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MBE's Business Opportunities resource covers business-related financing, consulting, and programs available for the Supplier Diversity community and M/WBEs. Updated monthly.

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MBE's M/WBE Resource Directory is a comprehensive list of resource organizations (including links) that support the Supplier Diversity community and M/WBEs.

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Refer to MBE's Acronyms & Terminology list for frequently used acronyms and terminology and an overview of the major organizations supporting the Supplier Diversity community.

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